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  • Engraving Depth

    FrontPanelExpress is one of the most fantastic companies I've ever dealt with. Your order/production process is great! I wish you people were around about 30years ago.

     

    The subject says it all... is it possible to specify/reduce engraving depth in FrontDesign???

    Posted By: Doug Evans on May 05, 2012 04:35AM Category: Production

    :) Thank you

     

    Not in the Designer but we can do this for you.

     

    The standard settings for engravings are:

    0.2mm deep when using tool 0.2mm

    0.4mm deep for all other tools

     

    Tool 0.2 and 0.4 are engravers with 40 degree angles. All other tools are endmills.

     

    Those micro tools tend to break easily, which is one of the reasons you can't modify engraving depths in FPD. However, all endmills starting with tool diameter 1mm work fine (optional as dxf import and choose cavity)

     

    Just leave a note for us in the panel properties to request the changes you would like us to do.

     

    Thank you again for your kind words.

     

    Diane

    Posted By: Diane Haensel on May 06, 2012 01:44AM

    Reply

    Oh I forgot, reducing the depth is not limited to a tool.

    We would go in the mill program and make the changes there.

    Posted By: Diane Haensel on May 06, 2012 01:47AM

    Reply

    Thanks for the info, Diane... but I'm still somewhat confused.

     

    I just had two small panels done and they looked great. But the source drawing for one of them was wrong and I stupidly didn't double check my drawings against the actual enclosure for errors. So I need to submit the corrected design.

     

    On the original panel, I had legends done in Euro 5 stroke, 0.060" high text. The legends came out looking great, but I feel they're too deep (no fill-in). I'm also confused by your description of the 0.2mm tool being a 40deg tool. I looked at the engraved legends with my 10x loupe and they all appear to have been done by a square tool.

     

    From what you said, I would assume that deeper engravings would tend to break the fragile 0.2mm tools more often. But would shallower engravings, say 0.05mm to 0.1mm, cause less breakage?

     

    I am changing my design to use Univ 1 stroke, 0.080" text height, 120% x-scale. Would an engraving depth of 0.05mm to 0.1mm be possible with the 0.2mm tool??

    Posted By: Doug Evans on May 10, 2012 04:09AM

    Reply

    Hello Dough,

     

    On the original panel, I had legends done in Euro 5 stroke, 0.060" high text. The legends came out looking great, but I feel they're too deep (no fill-in). I'm also confused by your description of the 0.2mm tool being a 40deg tool. I looked at the engraved legends with my 10x loupe and they all appear to have been done by a square tool.

     

    Our hpgl tips show a picture of the available tools. Both the 0.2mm and 0.4mm tool are engravers with a 40 degree angle. You might not be able to see it with a 10x magnification.

     

    From what you said, I would assume that deeper engravings would tend to break the fragile 0.2mm tools more often. But would shallower engravings, say 0.05mm to 0.1mm, cause less breakage?

     

    Exactly, but shallower engravings won't hold the paint. The position tolerance of our machines is 0.05mm, which means an engraving depth of 0.05mm could be almost invisible. The Euro 5 font will be more defined in a size of 0.060" by going only 0.1mm deep but we cannot perform the paint infill.

     

    I am changing my design to use Univ 1 stroke, 0.080" text height, 120% x-scale. Would an engraving depth of 0.05mm to 0.1mm be possible with the 0.2mm tool??

     

    Univ1stroke in 0.080" with 1205 x-scale should work in 0.1mm depth. However, no infill paint can be applied and an additional programming charge of $15 will be added to your order (because we need to modify the milling program manually).

     

    I hope this explains it a little more in detail. Let me know if I can be of any further assistance.

     

    Best regards,

    Diane

     

    Posted By: Diane Haensel on May 14, 2012 09:55PM

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